The Danger of Believing in Fairy Tales: a Spoken Word Poem

I This poem was written for and performed at the Juke Open Mic night in Little Man Coffee, Cardiff on 19th April 2016. Some of the wording is applicable only to the event as I was writing with it in mind – the theme being ‘Fairy Tales and Myths.’ The event itself was great and I…

International Women’s Day 2016

There are undeniably hundreds of women to look up to, from friends, to writers, actresses and activists. Women have done great things for this world, from founding Dogs Trust in 1891 (Lady Gertrude Stock), to pioneering sex-reassingment surgery for transgender men and women (Lili Elbe). In honour of International Women’s Day 2016, here are three…

Y Creadur/The Creature by Harri Gwynn

In a shadowy, circular room at Aberystywth Arts Centre, on the centenary of Harri Gwynn’s birth, writers Robert Minhinnick and Twm Morys came together last autumn to perform the poet’s original 1952 National Eisteddfod entry, ‘Y Creadur.’ As I enter the room, Twm Morys stands below a dome-shaped ceiling. Centre-stage and dimly lit, he welcomes…

Wonderful Women: Female Writers for your Bookshelf

Wonderfully Weird Women Who Write: Why we should read Fiction by Women The Guardian recently featured a small article stating that female writers are often overlooked and marginalised in a male-dominated industry. It’s a widely accepted fact that while women are published in roughly the same numbers as men, their works are sidelined by reviewers…

Fairy Tales and Freud: Psychoanalysis in Children’s Stories

Psychoanalytic theory, founded by Sigmund Freud during the twentieth century as a means to evaluate and cure mentally disturbed patients, lurks beneath the surface of traditional Fairy Tales, barely hidden. When these stories are read in Freudian terms of latent and manifest content, (as described in ‘The Interpretation of Dreams‘), it’s possible to read familiar narratives as…

Sylvia Plath’s Recovery of Selfhood in Ariel – ‘Getting There’

Written in the weeks leading up to Plath’s suicide, Ariel is characterised by a desire to restore her broken self through death, and often, rebirth. A foreboding presence lurks over Plath’s final collection,  a desperation to shed her skin and recover a new identity. Tim Kendall claims that the Ariel poems are ‘poems of becoming rather than being….