Y Creadur/The Creature by Harri Gwynn

In a shadowy, circular room at Aberystywth Arts Centre, on the centenary of Harri Gwynn’s birth, writers Robert Minhinnick and Twm Morys came together last autumn to perform the poet’s original 1952 National Eisteddfod entry, ‘Y Creadur.’ As I enter the room, Twm Morys stands below a dome-shaped ceiling. Centre-stage and dimly lit, he welcomes…

The Truth Will Out: A Review

The Truth Will Out, Jane Isaac Star Rating I received The Truth Will Out,  wrapped in brown paper and stamped by Legend Press, through the post not long ago. The pages bound by the mysterious cover contain a thrilling crime story. In the very first pages we jump straight in to the action, as Eva…

Wonderful Women: Female Writers for your Bookshelf

Wonderfully Weird Women Who Write: Why we should read Fiction by Women The Guardian recently featured a small article stating that female writers are often overlooked and marginalised in a male-dominated industry. It’s a widely accepted fact that while women are published in roughly the same numbers as men, their works are sidelined by reviewers…

Between the Sheets: Book Release

Between the Sheets: a Fairy Tale Collection You may already have seen the page on this blog about the work in progress, Between the Sheets. Well, I’ve finally released it as a short collection in the form of an ebook! The book can be downloaded from Amazon as an ebook for the Kindle or straight to your…

How To: Alice in Wonderland Themed Tea-Party

My friends and I hosted an Alice in Wonderland themed fancy dress party last week. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is one of my favourite childhood stories, and with its bizarre plot-line, whimsical characters and the obnoxious child at it’s centre, an Alice-themed party is a recipe for a fantastic night. The party was so much fun, and…

Sylvia Plath’s Recovery of Selfhood in Ariel – ‘Medusa’

Written in the weeks leading up to Plath’s suicide, Ariel is characterised by a desire to restore her broken self through death, and often, rebirth. A foreboding presence lurks over Plath’s final collection,  a desperation to shed her skin and recover a new identity. Tim Kendall claims that the Ariel poems are ‘poems of becoming rather than being….

Sylvia Plath’s Recovery of Selfhood in Ariel – ‘Getting There’

Written in the weeks leading up to Plath’s suicide, Ariel is characterised by a desire to restore her broken self through death, and often, rebirth. A foreboding presence lurks over Plath’s final collection,  a desperation to shed her skin and recover a new identity. Tim Kendall claims that the Ariel poems are ‘poems of becoming rather than being….

Ruth Dugdall on ‘The Woman Before Me’, Twisted Plots and Human Psychology

When Dugdall’s book was first published in 2010, it sold 40,000 copies, surpassing the expectations of both its publishing house and its author. With no broadsheet coverage, the book had sold primarily through word of mouth. On October 31st of this year, the title is being re-released, complete with a new cover, additional chapter, mini-essay…

Sylvia Plath’s Recovery of Selfhood in Ariel – ‘Tulips’

Written in the weeks leading up to Plath’s suicide, Ariel is characterised by a desire to restore the broken self through death, and often, rebirth. A foreboding presence lurks over Plath’s final collection,  a desperation to shed her skin and recover a new identity. Tim Kendall claims that the Ariel poems are ‘poems of becoming rather than being. Their…

The Woman Before Me: A Review

Following an invitation on Twitter to read and evaluate books for independent publisher Legend Press, I’ve opted to post book reviews on my blog. In exchange for an honest review of their most recent publications, I get a free book, which, being a student, is always a bonus. Seems like a win-win situation to me, so…

Is Writing the Right Thing to Do? Why we write and what it means.

‘A writer of story books? What kind of a business in life, – what mode of glorifying God, or being serviceable to mankind in his day and generation, – may that be?’ In The Scarlet Letter, Hawthorne uses these words to describe the attitudes of men towards writers. With regards to fiction, some scientifically-minded people…

The Dark Side of Writing: Should we Swear in Literature?

‘Reading literature remains a civilising activity, no matter that it’s literature in which people do and say abominable things and the author curses like the very devil’ – Howard Jacobson. I read the above in an article from The Guardian recently, in which Jacobson was discussing Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, amongst other texts. The jist…