Wild Life by Liam Brown: a Review

Wild Life by Liam Brown Coming 13.6.16 ‘And at that moment the world seemed to wobble and then topple completely from its axis.’ Star Rating  Liam Brown’s novel Wild Life tells the story of Adam, who can do nothing to prevent his life from crumbling around him when he loses his job as a high-profile advertising…

10 brilliant books to keep you busy this Summer

Run out of reading material? Lacking inspiration and wondering what to read next? Check out a few of the Book Reviews below for detailed synopses of some fantastic novels to keep you entertained all Summer! After Before | Jemma Wayne Before it’s Too Late | Jane Isaac The Truth Will Out | Jane Isaac Fractured | Clár Ni Chonghaile Humber Boy B |…

Armadillos: a Review

Armadillos by P K Lynch ‘A person could only choose left or right from our gate. The right road led to town where people knew me. I chose left. That way was the rest of the world.’ Star Rating  Aggie is a tough world-weary fifteen year old from the Texas outbacks with only the vaguest idea…

Book Review: Fractured by Clár Ni Chonghaile

 Fractured by Clár Ni Chonghaile ‘The stars do not banish the dark. They just let us see exactly how black the sky is.’ Star Rating Fractured tells the story of Peter Maguire, an ordinary journalist who finds himself attacked, kidnapped and held to ransom by Somalian rebels. With nothing to do in the heat of the dark and dingy outhouse but…

Book Review: Mr Quin; Love and Death

Mr Quin; Love and Death by TELL productions, with Agatha Christie ‘Tonight is going to be a hoot…’ Star Rating When Lady Laura Evesham and her husband Tom decide to host a highly-publicised party at their large manor house, some restless ghosts are unearthed. The press have a field day when they learn that the house once belonged…

Nowhere Girl: a Review

Nowhere Girl by Ruth Dugdall ‘A wanderer, a mongrel, she feels she belongs nowhere in particular. Home is somewhere else, but she hasn’t found it yet.’ Star Rating  When seventeen year old Ellie Scheen disappears during Luxembourg’s biggest festival, her world is rocked beyond belief. The police will not file a missing person’s report for forty-eight hours, especially not…

Touched by Joanna Briscoe: a Review

Touched by Joanna Briscoe ”Where is Eva?’ said Rowena as the sun sank in honeyed shadows over the green, geese flying overhead. No one knew.’ Star Rating  Rowena Crale and her family have moved away from London City to the picture-perfect English village of Crowsley Beck. While the green grass and small-town atmosphere seem idyllic,…

Before It’s Too Late: a Review

Before It’s Too Late by Jane Isaac ‘The plan had been several months in the making, yet thwarted at the last moment. [He] only wanted to be friends…’ Star Rating  Isaac’s newest novel, Before It’s Too Late, is a crime thriller written with ease and insight. Chinese student Min Li goes missing following an argument…

Humber Boy B: a Review

Humber Boy B by Ruth Dugdall ‘They all felt it… because it had mattered, what Ben did, a great deal. Everyone stood on the bridge had felt the impact.’ Star Rating Humber Boy B is the third Dugdall title starring single mother and probation officer Cate Austen. When I interviewed Ruth about a previous novel, The Woman…

To the Edge of Shadows by Joanne Graham: a Review

 To the Edge of Shadows by Joanne Graham ‘I hadn’t planned things the way they happened… I didn’t think it would end with her walking out of the night, bleeding and afraid.’ Star Rating Joanne Graham’s debut novel, Lacey’s House, won the Luke Bitmead Bursary in 2012. Similarly to her first book, which tells the story of two…

After Before: A Review

After Before, Jemma Wayne Star Rating: The title of Jemma Wayne’s highly accomplished début seems, at first glance, a little contradictory. On reading the novel, however, the words begin to make perfect sense, and are, in fact, the most appropriate combination of characters that could have been chosen to describe this book. After Before follows the emotional journeys…

Y Creadur/The Creature by Harri Gwynn

In a shadowy, circular room at Aberystywth Arts Centre, on the centenary of Harri Gwynn’s birth, writers Robert Minhinnick and Twm Morys came together last autumn to perform the poet’s original 1952 National Eisteddfod entry, ‘Y Creadur.’ As I enter the room, Twm Morys stands below a dome-shaped ceiling. Centre-stage and dimly lit, he welcomes…